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How To Use Carrier Oil?: Carrier Oils & Their Benefits

by Helen
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What are carrier oils?

Both carrier oils and essential oils are produced from plants. Carrier oils are typically used to dilute essential oils and “carry” them to your skin. Essential oils are very potent and can cause severe skin irritation when applied undiluted directly to your skin, therefore, diluting essential oils with carrier oils. The carrier oil (CO) chosen for treatment will depend on the outcome you are looking for.

Most carrier oils for skin have little or no scent and don’t interfere with an essential oil’s therapeutic properties. They may be used alone or with other oils to nourish your skin. This article looks at carrier oils and how they can be used alongside essential oils.

Would you like to learn more about carrier oils? If so, keep reading to learn how to choose the right carrier oil, available carrier oils, and more.

What does carrier oil mean?

Per Wikipedia, Carrier oil, also known as base oil or vegetable oil, is used to dilute essential oils and absolutes before they are applied to the skin in massage and aromatherapy.

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Per Wikipedia,

Carrier oil, also known as base oil or vegetable oil, is used to dilute essential oils and absolutes before they are applied to the skin in mass.

Think About – Carrier Oil Basics:

  • Odor: Several carrier oils for skin have a distinct scent. When mixed with essential oil, it may change the aroma.
  • Absorption: Some carrier oils for the skin are absorbed faster than others by the skin.
  • Skin type: Some carrier oils for the skin can irritate or worsen a skin condition like acne, but it depends on your skin type.
  • Shelf life: Some carrier oils for skin have a longer shelf life and can be stored longer than others without becoming rancid.

Essential Oil vs. Carrier Oil

Essential oils (EO) are distilled from raw plant material, consisting of the flowers' leaves, bark, roots, seeds, or peel. Also, essential oils will evaporate and have a strong aroma. On the other hand, COs are pressed from the fatty portions of nuts, kernels, seeds, and fruits.  Moreover, they do not evaporate or have an aroma like essential oils.  Also, carrier oils can become rancid over time, but essential oils do not. Eventually, all EO degrade, and the primary direct cause of this is a process known as oxidation.  This is why understanding carrier and essential oil basics are so important.  I have found that fractionated coconut oil is the least greasy and doesn't stain clothes.
 
Carrier Oils for different skin types:
  1. Normal Skin – Hempseed, Coconut, Grapeseed, Sunflower, and Sweet Almond
  2. Oily Skin – Grapeseed, Sweet Almond, Apricot Oil, Jojoba, and Sunflower
  3. Dry Skin – Avocado, Sweet Almond, Rosehips, and Olive Oil
  4. Carrier oils for Sensitive Skin  – Jojoba, Sesame Seed, Sweet Almond, and Apricot
  5. Mature Skin – Jojoba, Sesame Seed, Rosehips, Sweet Almond, and Apricot Oil
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What are carrier oils?

Carrier oils labeled for use as cosmetics are not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.  But, they control edible cooking oils that may be used as carrier oils.

We recommend only therapeutic-grade carrier oils from a reputable and trusted manufacturer, one you trust.  Things to look for when buying oils are cold-pressed, 100 percent pure, plus additive- or preservative-free.  Plus, if you use cooking oil as a carrier oil, it is best to choose cold-pressed, organic types. What do you dilute essential oils with

Below is a list of popular carrier oils for skin frequently used to dilute essential oils with a carrier oil for massage, aromatherapy, and skin care products.  This list isn’t exhaustive, but we think it is an excellent place to start.

 1) Coconut Oil

 Coconut oil is edible; It is made from the meat of mature coconuts. It comes in two varieties refined or unrefined.  Unrefined coconut oil is made from fresh coconut meat. Since it is not processed with chemicals, it has a soft coconut aroma and flavor.

On The other hand, refined coconut oil is made from dried coconut meat, also called copra. It is processed, bleached, and deodorized to remove impurities, also the distinct coconut aroma and flavor. Therefore refined coconut isn't all-natural, and we don't recommend it as a carrier oil.

2) Jojoba oil

Where does jojoba oil come from? Jojoba oil is made from the seeds of the jojoba plant. Jojoba oil has a light, delicate, nutty aroma. But technically, jojoba is not an oil. It is a wax with very significant moisturizing properties. The belief is it is like mimics sebum, the skin's natural oil. Acne-prone skin may benefit from jojoba oil because it may help reduce its oil production. Jojoba makes the skin think it has produced enough oil.
>Uses: Jojoba oil does not clog pores and absorbs easily and quickly. Its properties make it a suitable carrier oil choice for massage oils, facial moisturizers, body butter, and bath oils.  

Recommended Uses: Coconut oil contains skin-nourishing fatty acids and polyphenols, making it an excellent carrier oil for massage oils and homemade skin care preparations.

3) Sweet Almond Oil

Sweet almond oil has a potent, nutty aroma, and its edible oil is made from sweet almonds kernels. This oil is lightweight, absorbs pretty easily, and is an excellent moisturizer for dry skin.

It, too, is used in general aromatherapy, but since it has a strong scent, it may mask the essential oil's aroma.
Uses: Sweet almond is another popular carrier oil for skin care because it's excellent in massage oils, bath oils, and melt-and-pour homemade soaps.

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Apricot Carrier Oil

4) Apricot Kernel Oil

Our next oil on our list, Apricot kernel oil, is made from apricot seeds. These seeds are known as kernels, known as emollient oil with high fatty acid and vitamin E content.  Plus, it is easily absorbed into the skin and has a slightly sweet, nutty scent. It comes in both edible apricot kernel oil and apricot kernel oil for use in cosmetics only.

Uses: It is thought, Apricot kernel oil can help calm and soften irritated, itchy skin. Best used as a carrier oil to make massage oils, bath oil, and hair care preparations. 

5) Argan oil

Argan oil is made from kernels inside the fruit of the Argan tree, which is native to Morocco. The oil of the Argan tree is edible, and it nourishes the body inside and out. Also, it has a nutty aroma and is rich in vitamins A and E and monounsaturated fatty acids.

Uses: Argan oil is used to help treat dry skin, hair, wrinkles, and skin inflammation. These properties make it an excellent carrier oil for general skin and massage oils.

Olive Carrier Oil

6) Olive Oil

Olive oil comes from pressed olives, and I bet you know that. We know it mainly as a healthy, edible oil used for cooking with a fruity aroma, although it’s also commonly used in aromatherapy as a carrier oil.
Extra-virgin olive oil is the go-to oil for uses, for example, aromatherapy and skin care homemade items. Keep in mind olive oil’s scent may mask the aroma of some essential oils.

Uses: Olive oil is loaded with fatty acids and plant sterols, which makes it great for cleansing and moisturizing dry skin. You can use olive oil as a carrier oil for various things like massage, facial cleansers, hair care, and homemade melt-and-pour soaps.

Rosehip Carrier Oil

7) Rosehip Oil

 

The Rosehip oil comes from the fruit and seeds of the Rosa rubiginosa bush or the Rosa moschata bush; a wild rose bush. The oil is made by pressing rosehips, the bright orange fruit seed. Also, Rosehips are mainly grown in the Andes Mountains and farmed in Africa and Europe. Although Rosehip oil, one may think it smells like a rose, in actuality, it has a nutty, earthy scent.

Uses: Rosehip oil is high in vitamins C, and A. Vitamin A acts like a natural retinoid that helps fight aging. Also, both of these vitamins may help reverse the harsh effects of the sun on your skin. It is recommended as a carrier oil for dry skin remedies, night creams, moisturizers, and massage oils.

7) Rosehip Oil

The Rosehip oil comes from the fruit and seeds of the Rosa rubiginosa bush or the Rosa moschata bush; a wild rose bush. The oil is made by pressing rosehips, the bright orange fruit seed. Also, Rosehips are mainly grown in the Andes Mountains and farmed in Africa and Europe. Although Rosehip oil, one may think it smells like a rose, in actuality, it has a nutty, earthy scent. Uses: Rosehip oil is high in vitamins C, and A. Vitamin A acts like a natural retinoid that helps fight aging. Also, both of these vitamins may help reverse the harsh effects of the sun on your skin. It is recommended as a carrier oil for dry skin remedies, night creams, moisturizers, and massage oils.

8) Grape Seed Oil

Grape seed oil does come from grape seeds. It's a by-product of the winemaking process. Plus, it is rich in vitamin E, which is a nutrient that is supposed to heal the skin and reduce wrinkles, though scientific research has been inconsistent.

Uses: Grape seed oil is a lightweight oil that's easily absorbed by the skin and has a neutral aroma. Therefore, it's an excellent carrier oil to use with any essential oils to make body oils and massage oils.

9) Avocado oil

Avocado oil is a thick, heavy edible oil made from avocado fruit. Like other oils, it has a nutty aroma.
Since Avocado oil is high in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, it is thought to help relieve dry, damaged skin.

Uses: This carrier oil is used for diluting essential oils and is good for dry skin, homemade remedies, and body creams — unless you have acne. Avocado oil may raise sebum production, so if you tend to have acne-prone skin, it is best to check with your dermatologist before trying it.

10) Sunflower oil

Sunflower oil is safe to eat oil since it is extracted from sunflower seeds. It has a neutral odor.
This oil is said to have a skin barrier against toxins and germs that may cause infection, making it an excellent choice for irritated skin.

Uses: It’s supposed to help soften skin, moisturize skin, and alleviate irritation; add this carrier oil to your inventory and use it in massage oils or use for general skin care. 

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How to mix carrier oil with essential oils

Carrier oil is used to dilute essential oils, baths, or applied neatly on the skin.  I have been using essential oils for over a decade. I am a Doterra Wellness Advocate.  Doterra essential oils are high-quality and therapeutic-grade and are sustainable. We recommend purchasing cold-pressed carrier oils from a reputable manufacturer. Even though most carrier oils don’t cause allergic reactions, we recommend always doing a patch test before using them.
While research suggests that essential oils have health benefits, the FDA doesn’t monitor or regulate their purity. Before using essential oils, you should talk with a healthcare professional, and please be sure to research the quality and purity of the brand of your products. Also, always perform before using new essential oil.

How to perform a patch test:

  • First – Add a small amount of carrier oil to the inside of your wrist, forearm, or just below your ear.
  • Second – Cover the area where you applied the oil with a bandage.
  • Third – Check on the site after 24 hours.
  • Fourth – If you have any irritation, rinse thoroughly, and avoid future use of that particular oil.

If you have known allergies to tree nuts, you should avoid using oils derived from any tree nuts, including sweet almond oil, argan oil, and apricot kernel oil.

Diluting essential oils with a carrier oil list is crucial and necessary to follow these dilution guidelines.

For adults:

  • 2.5 percent dilution: 15 drops essential oil per 6 teaspoons carrier oil
  • 3 percent dilution: 20 drops essential oil per 6 teaspoons carrier oil
  • 5 percent dilution: 30 drops essential oil per 6 teaspoons carrier oil
  • 10 percent dilution: 60 drops essential oil per 6 teaspoons carrier oil

For children:

  • 0.5 to 1 percent dilution: 3 to 6 drops essential oil per 6 teaspoons carrier oil

Carrier Oils should be stored in a cool, dark place, preferably in the fridge. Always use dark, opaque bottles when storing any oils.

While research suggests essential oils have health benefits, the FDA does not monitor or regulate the quality or purity of any essential oils. We recommend you talk with your healthcare professional before using essential oils and always research the quality of your brand’s products. Also, be sure to do a before trying a new essential oil.

 

How to Use 

First, you can combine the essential and carrier oil(s), then apply the mixture wherever you need it.  Furthermore, the other option is to purchase a pre-formulated blend already in a roller bottle. To save money, reuse the roller bottle with your unique blend.  Plus, you can use carrier oils in conjunction with different kinds of butter and essential oils to create Epson Salt baths, face, hand, and body butter or balms, for the whole family that does not contain parabens, fragrances, fillers, or sulfates.

The bottom line – the use of Carrier Oils

Carrier oils used for diluting essential oils – help dilute essential oils and make it possible to use them safely. They also help nourish and moisturize your skin. Although not oils make good carrier oils. Avoid using products like butter, petroleum jelly, and mineral oil.

Regardless of the oil, you choose to use, avoid using them on your lips, eyes, or any other sensitive areas after it has been mixed with essential oil. Although, it is safe to apply carrier oils alone to these areas.

The main takeaway of the difference between carriers and essential oils is that you use carriers to dilute and apply essential oils onto the skin. Also, the dilution percentage varies according to age and intent of use. Carrier oils are the foundation for DIY beauty products and help essential oils meet their maximum efficiency. Now that you know the difference have fun with your DIY and using essential oils.

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